Reddit

Reddit logo

Reddit is a social news aggregation, web content rating, and discussion website, and it claims to be "the front page of the internet" as its moniker, recently including live stream content through Reddit Public Access Network.

Quick Fact

Summary

  • Ranked #20th worldwide
  • Active users 1.5 B
  • Type Discussion Networks
  • Launched date June 2005
  • Employees 400
  • Headquarters San Francisco, California, U.S
  • Parent company Condé Nast (2006 - Present)

Founders

person
Steve Huffman Michigan
person
AaronSwartz
person
AlexisOhanian

Networks

  • Brand value In 2020 $6 B
  • Revenue in 2020 $170 M
  • Net loss In 2020 N/A

Current Controversies

Current ControversiesSteve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian, listens during a Bloomberg West

Television in San Francisco, California, U.S (via bdnews24.com)

After the 2021 storming of the United States Capitol, Reddit announced that it had banned the subreddit r/DonaldTrump in response to repeated policy violations and alluding to the potential influence the community had on those who participated in or supported the storming.

The move followed similar actions from social media platforms, Twitter, YouTube, TikTok, and more. The ban brought controversy from those who believed it furthered an agenda and censorship of conservative ideologies. The subreddit had over 52,000 members just before it was banned.

In Mar, Reddit users discovered that Aimee Challenor, an English politician who had been suspended from two UK political parties, was hired as an administrator for the site.

Her first suspension from the Green Party came for retaining her father as her campaign manager after his arrest on child sexual abuse charges. She was later suspended from the Liberal Democrats after tweets describing pedophilic fantasies were discovered on her partner's Twitter account.

Reddit banned a moderator for posting a news article that mentioned Challenor, and some Reddit users alleged that Reddit was removing all mention of Challenor. A large number of subreddits, including r/Music which had 27 million subscribers, and 19 other subreddits with over 1 million subscribers, went private in protest.

On 24 Mar, Reddit's CEO Steve Huffman said that Challenor had been inadequately vetted before being hired and that Reddit would review its relevant internal processes. He attributed user suspensions to over-indexing on anti-harassment measures.

Challenor was also removed from her role as a Reddit admin.

Community And Culture

The website is known for its open nature and diverse user community that generates its content.

Its demographics allow for wide-ranging subject areas, as well as the ability for smaller subreddits to serve more niche purposes. The possibilities that subreddits provide create new opportunities for raising attention and fostering discussion across various areas. In gaining popularity in terms of unique users per day, Reddit has been a platform to raise publicity for a number of causes.

Additionally, the user base of Reddit has given birth to other websites, including image sharing community and image host Imgur, which started in 2009 as a gift to Reddit's community. In its first five months, it jumped from a thousand hits per day to a million total page views.

Statistics from Google Ad Planner suggest that 74% of Reddit users are male. In 2016 the Pew Research Center published research showing that 4% of U.S. adults use Reddit, of which 67% are men. 78% of users get news from Reddit. Users tend to be significantly younger than average with less than 1% of users being 65 or over.

Reddit is known in part for its passionate user base, which has been described as "offbeat, quirky, and anti-establishment". Similar to the "Slashdot effect", the Reddit effect occurs when a smaller website crashes due to a high influx of traffic after being linked to on Reddit; this is also called the Reddit "hug of death".

Philanthropy

PhilanthropyKathleen Edward was dying from Huntington’s disease.

She posed for a picture, holding a handwritten sign reading,

“THANK YOU, REDDIT!”. (via dailydot.com)

Users have used Reddit as a platform for their charitable and philanthropic efforts.

Redditors raised more than $100,000 for charity in support of comedians Jon Stewart's and Stephen Colbert's Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear; more than $180,000 for Haiti earthquake relief efforts; and delivered food pantries' Amazon wish lists.

In 2010, Christians, Muslims, and atheists held a friendly fundraising competition, where the groups raised more than $50,000. A similar donation drive in 2011 saw the atheism subreddit raise over $200,000 for charity.

In Feb 2014, Reddit announced it would donate 10% of its annual ad revenue to non-profits voted upon by its users.

As a result of the campaign, Reddit donating $82,765 each to Electronic Frontier Foundation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Doctors Without Borders, Erowid Center, Wikimedia Foundation, Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, NPR, Free Software Foundation, Freedom From Religion Foundation, and Tor Project.

Internet Privacy, Neutrality, And Anonymity

Reddit created an Internet blackout day and was joined by Wikipedia and other sites in 2012 in protest of the Stop Online Piracy and Protect IP Act.

On Jan 18, Reddit participated in a 12-hour sitewide blackout to coincide with a congressional committee hearing on the measures. During that time, Reddit displayed a message on the legislation's effects on Reddit, in addition to resources on the proposed laws.

In May 2012, Reddit joined the Internet Defense League, a group formed to organize future protests. The site and its users protested the Federal Communications Commission as it prepared to scrap net neutrality rules.

In 2017, users upvoted "Battle for the Net" posts enough times that they filled up the entire front page.

On another day, the front page was overtaken by posts showcasing campaign donations received by members of Congress from the telecommunications industry. Reddit CEO Steve Huffman has also advocated for net neutrality rules.

In 2017, Huffman told The New York Times that without net neutrality protections, "you give internet service providers the ability to choose winners and losers".

On Reddit, Huffman urged redditors to express support for net neutrality and contact their elected representatives in Washington, D.C. He said that the repeal of net neutrality rules stifles competition. He said he and Reddit would continue to advocate for net neutrality.

Science

ScienceLogo of Scientific Discussion Series. (via reddit.com)

Aggregate Reddit user data has been used for scientific research.

A 2014 study showed how subreddits can support role-based group recommendations or provide evaluation towards group stability and growth.

Another study evoked a connection between cognitive and attention dynamics and the usage of online social peer production platforms, including the effects of deterioration of user performance.

There is also work that has studied the influence of Reddit posts on the popularity of Wikipedia content.

Data from Reddit can also be used to assess academic publications.

Controversies

Reddit generally allows subreddit moderators to make editorial decisions about what content to allow. Many of the default subreddits are highly moderated, with the "science" subreddit banning climate change denialism, and the "news" subreddit banning opinion pieces and columns.

Reddit has changed its site-wide editorial policies several times, sometimes in reaction to controversies.

Reddit has historically been a platform for objectionable but legal content, and in 2011, news media covered the way that jailbait was being shared on the site before the site changed their policies to explicitly ban "suggestive or sexual content featuring minors".

Following some controversial incidents of Internet vigilantism, Reddit introduced a strict rule against the publication of non-public personally identifying information via the site (colloquially known as doxing). Those who break the rule are subject to a site-wide ban, which can result in the deletion of their user-generated content.

2010

On Dec 16, a user named Matt posted a link describing how he had donated a kidney and included a JustGive link to encourage users to give donations to the American Cancer Society. After an initially positive reaction, Reddit users began to become suspicious of Matt's intentions and suggested that he was keeping the donations for himself. Users telephoned his home and he received death threats. Matt eventually proved that he was genuine by uploading his doctor's records.

2011

On Oct 18, an IT manager submitted a post to the subreddit r/gameswap offering Redditors to trade one of 312 codes he had been given for the game Deus Ex: Human Revolution. A group of users obtained his personal details and began to blackmail him for the codes. Within days, he received 138 threatening phone calls both at home and at his job and had been fired by the end of the day.

2013

  • Following the Boston Marathon bombing in Apr, Reddit faced criticism after users wrongly identified a number of people as suspects. Notable among misidentified bombing suspects was Sunil Tripathi, a student reported missing before the bombings took place. A body reported to be Sunil's was found in Providence River in Rhode Island on Apr 25, according to Rhode Island Health Department. The cause of death was not immediately known, but authorities said they did not suspect foul play. The family later confirmed Tripathi's death was a result of suicide. Reddit general manager Martin later issued an apology for this behavior, criticizing the "online witch hunts and dangerous speculation" that took place on the website. The incident was later referenced in the season 5 episode of the CBS TV series The Good Wife titled "Whack-a-Mole", as well as The Newsroom.
  • In late Oct, the moderators of the subreddit "r/politics" banned a large group of websites. Some were left-wing opinion websites, such as Mother Jones, HuffPost, Salon, AlterNet, Rawstory, The Daily Kos, Truthout, Media Matters, and ThinkProgress as well as some progressive blog sites, such as Democratic Underground and Crooks and Liars. They also banned a number of right-wing sites—Drudge Report, Breitbart, The Daily Caller, Dailypaul, Power Line, and Reason. Salon reported that "the section's moderators explained in a post on Tuesday, the goal is 'to reduce the number of blogspam submissions and sensationalist titles'". The purge, the moderators explained, is also aimed at sites providing much "bad journalism". The December list of banned websites has been modified since late October, and sites with original content, such as Mother Jones and The Huffington Post, are allowed. Moderators also banned RT, which moderators stated was due to vote manipulation and spam, though one moderator stated that he wanted RT banned because it is funded by the Russian Government.

2014

In Aug, private sexual photos from the celebrity photo hack were widely disseminated across the site. A dedicated subreddit, "TheFappening", was created for this purpose, and contained links to most if not all of the criminally obtained explicit images. Some images of McKayla Maroney and Liz Lee were identified by redditors and outside commentators as child pornography because the photos were taken when the women were underage. The subreddit was banned on Sep 6. The scandal led to wider criticisms concerning the website's administration from The Verge and The Daily Dot.

2015

  • After Ellen Pao became CEO, she was initially a target of criticism by users who objected to the deletion of content critical of herself and her husband. Later on June 10, Reddit shut down the 150,000-subscriber "fatpeoplehate" subreddit and four others citing issues related to harassment. This move was seen as very controversial; some commenters said that the bans went too far, while others said that the bans did not go far enough. One of the latter complaints concerned a subreddit that was "expressing support" for the perpetrator of the Charleston church shooting. Responding to the accusations of "skewed enforcement", Reddit reaffirmed their commitment to free expression and stated, "There are some subreddits with very little viewership that get highlighted repeatedly for their content, but those are a tiny fraction of the content on the site."
  • On July 2, Reddit began experiencing a series of blackouts as moderators set popular subreddit communities to private, in an event dubbed "AMAgeddon", a portmanteau of AMA ("ask me anything") and Armageddon. This was done in protest of the recent firing of Victoria Taylor, an administrator who helped organize citizen-led interviews with famous people on the popular AMA subreddit. Organizers of the blackout also expressed resentment about the recent severance of the communication between Reddit and the moderators of subreddits. The blackout intensified on July 3 when former community manager David Croach gave an AMA about being fired. Before deleting his posts, he stated that Ellen Pao dismissed him with one year of health coverage when he had cancer and did not recover quickly enough. Following this, a Change.org petition to remove Pao as CEO of Reddit Inc. reached over 200,000 signatures. Pao posted a response on July 3 as well as an extended version of it on July 6 in which she apologized for bad communication and not delivering on promises. She also apologized on behalf of the other administrators and noted that problems already existed over the past several years. On July 10, Pao resigned as CEO and was replaced by former CEO and co-founder Steve Huffman.
  • In Aug, Steve Huffman introduced a policy that led to the banning of several offensive and sexual communities. Included in the ban was lolicon, to which Huffman referred as "animated CP [child porn]". Some subreddits had also been quarantined due to having "highly offensive or upsetting content" such as r/European, r/swedenyes, r/drawpeople, r/kiketown, r/blackfathers, r/greatapes, and r/whitesarecriminals.

2016

  • In May, Steve Huffman said in an interview at the TNW Conference that, unlike Facebook, which "only knows what [its users are] willing to declare publicly", Reddit knows its users' "dark secrets" at the same time that the website's "values" page was updated in regards to its "privacy" section. The video reached the top of the website's main feed. Shortly thereafter, announcements concerning new advertisement content drew criticism on the website.
  • In Sep, a user named "Mormon documents" released thousands of administrative documents belonging to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, an action driven by the ex-Mormon and atheist communities on Reddit. Previously, on Apr 22, the same user had announced his plans to do so. Church officials commented that the documents did not contain anything confidential.
  • On Nov 23, Huffman admitted to having replaced his user name with the names of r/The_Donald moderators in many insulting comments. He did so by changing insulting comments made towards him and made it appear as if the insult were directed at the moderators of r/The_Donald.
  • On Nov 24, The Washington Post reported Reddit had banned the "Pizzagate" conspiracy board from their site, stating it violated their policy of posting personal information of others, triggering a wave of criticism from users on r/The_Donald, who felt the ban amounted to censorship. The Reddit forum r/pizzagate was devoted to a widely-debunked conspiracy theory alleging that the Comet Ping Pong pizzeria in Washington, D.C. "is at the center of a child-abuse ring tied to John Podesta, Mrs. Clinton's former campaign manager". After the forum was banned from Reddit, the words "we don't want witchhunts on our site" now appear on the former page of the Pizzagate subreddit.
  • On Nov 30, Huffman announced changes to the algorithm of Reddit's r/all page to block "stickied" posts from a number of subreddits, such as r/The_Donald. In the announcement, he also apologized for personally editing posts by users from r/The_Donald, and declared intentions to take actions against "hundreds of the most toxic users" of Reddit and "communities whose users continually cross the line".

2017

On July 12, the creator and head moderator of the GamerGate subreddit, r/KotakuInAction, removed all of the moderators and set the forum to private, alleging it to have become "infested with racism and sexism". A Reddit employee restored the forum and its moderators an hour later.

2019

  • In Jan, the Filipino-themed subreddit r/jakolandia was accused of "distributing” posts of photos of women, including celebrities, apparently without their consent, similar to "a number" of secret Facebook groups that had been engaging in illegal activity of sharing "obscene" photos of women and possibly child pornography.
  • In Feb, Chinese company Tencent invested $150M into Reddit. This resulted in a large backlash from Reddit users, who were worried about potential censorship. Many posts featuring subjects censored in China, such as Tiananmen Square, Tank Man, and Winnie the Pooh, received popularity on Reddit.

2020

  • During the George Floyd protests in early June, over 800 moderators signed an open letter demanding a policy banning hate speech, a shutdown of racist and sexist subreddits, and more employee support for moderation. Bloomberg News pointed out the company's slow reaction to r/watchpeopledie, a subreddit dedicated to videos of people dying in accidents and other situations, and the harassment that accompanied new unmoderated features like icons for purchase and public chats.
  • On Jun 29, Reddit updated its content policy and introduced rules aimed at curbing the presence of communities they believed to be "promoting hate", and banned approximately 2,000 subreddits that were found to be in violation of the new guidelines on the same day. Larger subreddits affected by the bans included r/The_Donald, r/GenderCritical (the platform's largest and most active anti-transgender radical feminist subreddit), and r/ChapoTrapHouse (a far-left subreddit originally created by fans of the podcast Chapo Trap House). Some media outlets and political commentators also condemned the banning of the r/The_Donald and r/ChapoTrapHouse subreddits as a violation of the right to free political expression.
  • On Aug 3, moderators of the subreddit r/Animemes banned the usage of the word "trap" to refer to any person or fictional character. The ban was predicated on the real-world usage of the word "trap" as a slur against transgender people, with moderators citing the trans panic defense. In response, many users of the subreddit contended that "trap" was not being used in a transphobic manner, but instead to endearingly refer to cross-dressers, otokonoko, and characters with related identities in animanga. Many users flooded the subreddit with memes making fun of the rule change and the moderation team. Many left in protest, which resulted in a loss of over 100,000 subscribers.

2021

  • After the 2021 storming of the United States Capitol, Reddit announced that it had banned the subreddit r/DonaldTrump in response to repeated policy violations and alluding to the potential influence the community had on those who participated in or supported the storming. The move followed similar actions from social media platforms, Twitter, YouTube, TikTok, and more. The ban brought controversy from those who believed it furthered an agenda and censorship of conservative ideologies. The subreddit had over 52,000 members just before it was banned.
  • In Mar, Reddit users discovered that Aimee Challenor, an English politician who had been suspended from two UK political parties, was hired as an administrator for the site. Her first suspension from the Green Party came for retaining her father as her campaign manager after his arrest on child sexual abuse charges. She was later suspended from the Liberal Democrats after tweets describing pedophilic fantasies were discovered on her partner's Twitter account. Reddit banned a moderator for posting a news article that mentioned Challenor, and some Reddit users alleged that Reddit was removing all mention of Challenor. A large number of subreddits, including r/Music which had 27 million subscribers, and 19 other subreddits with over 1 million subscribers, went private in protest. On Mar 24, Reddit's CEO Steve Huffman said that Challenor had been inadequately vetted before being hired and that Reddit would review its relevant internal processes. He attributed user suspensions to over-indexing on anti-harassment measures. Challenor was also removed from her role as a Reddit admin.

Original Idea

original ideaoriginal idea

The idea and initial development originated with then college roommates Steve Huffman and Alexis Ohanian in 2005.

Huffman and Ohanian attended a lecture by programmer-entrepreneur Paul Graham in Boston, Massachusetts, during their spring break from the University of Virginia. After speaking with Huffman and Ohanian following the lecture, Graham invited the two to apply to his startup incubator Y Combinator.

Their initial idea, My Mobile Menu, was unsuccessful and was intended to allow users to order food by SMS text messaging. During a brainstorming session to pitch another startup, the idea was created for what Graham called the "front page of the Internet".

For this idea, Huffman and Ohanian were accepted in Y Combinator's first class. Supported by the funding from Y Combinator, Huffman coded the site in Common Lisp and together with Ohanian launched Reddit.

Brief History

2005
Jun Reddit was founded by Steve Huffman, Alexis Ohanian, and Aaron Swartz.
Dec The team expanded to include Christopher Slowe.
2006
Jan Merged with Aaron Swartz's company Infogami.
Oct Condé Nast Publications acquired the site. And the team moved to San Francisco.
Nov Swartz blogged complaining about the new corporate environment.
2007
Jan Swartz was fired for undisclosed reasons.
2008

Erik Martin, who joined the company as a community manager.

2009

Huffman and Ohanian left Reddit.

Reddit started using jQuery.

Nov Reddit used Pylons as its web framework.

Reddit decommissioned its own servers and migrated to Amazon Web Services.

2010

Release its first mobile web interface for easier reading and navigating the website on touch screen devices.

Apr April Fool was to make everyone on site an admin.
Jul Launched its Reddit Gold benefits program.
2011

Erik Martin became general manager.

Apr Replaced its Reddit Gold subscription with Reddit Mold.
Aug Ohanian outlined the logo's evolution with a graphic that showcased several early versions, including various spellings of the website name.
Sep Became operationally independent of Condé Nast.
Nov Reddit acquires fan-created RedditGifts site.
2012
Jan Participated in a 12-hour sitewide blackout in protest of the Stop Online Piracy Act.
Mar Yishan Wong joined Reddit as CEO.
May Joined the Internet Defense League - a group formed to organize future protests.
Sep Became an independent subsidiary of Condé Nast's parent company, Advance Publications.
2013
Feb Start accepting Bitcoin digital currency for Reddit Gold subscription service through bitcoin payment processor Coinbase.
Apr Acquired the video game Team Fortress 2.
2014

Wong resigned from Reddit.

Ellen Pao replaced Wong as interim CEO.

Feb Reddit announced it would donate 10% of its annual ad revenue to non-profits voted upon by its users.
Apr Reddit did "headdit".
May Reddit was blocked in Indonesia on the grounds that it hosts content that includes nudity.
Sep Released an app for Reddit's question-and-answer Ask Me Anything subreddit.
Oct Raised $50 million. This investment valued the company at $500 million then

Reddit acquired one of them, Alien Blue, which became the official iOS Reddit app.

Dec Ohanian became the full-time executive chairman.
2015

Reddit introduced a quarantine policy.

Mar Enabled embedding, so users could share Reddit content on other sites.
Apr A social experiment subreddit called r/thebutton appeared.
Jun Reddit was blocked in China. The site was unblocked later.
Jul Ellen Pao resigned as interim CEO because of a user revolt over the firing of a popular Reddit employee.

Huffman returns as the company's chief executive.

Aug Russia banned Reddit. The site was unblocked later.

Steve Huffman introduced a policy that led to the banning of several offensives and sexual communities

2016
Apr Reddit removed Alien Blue and released the official application, Reddit: The Official App, on Google Play and the iOS App Store.

Another experiment was launched involving the "Robin" chat widget.

May Began hosting images using a new image uploading tool.
Jun Reddit announced that it would begin using VigLink to redirect affiliate links.
2017

Partnered with companies to host sponsored AMAs and other interactive events.

Jan Released its "spoiler tags" feature.
Feb Unveiled changes to its public front page called r/popular.
Apr Featured a social experiment based on r/place.
May Slowe rejoined Reddit in 2017 as chief technology officer.
Jul A $200M raise raises the company's valuation to $1.8B
Aug Launching Reddit's in-house video uploading service for desktop and mobile.
Dec Launching Reddit's in-house video uploading service for desktop and mobile.
2018
Apr The company launched a major redesign of its website.

Reddit hired Jen Wong as COO.

Launched Reddit’s Circle of Trust on the subreddit r/circleoftrust.

Jul Developed its own real-time chat software for the site.
Sep Subreddits are allowed to appeal their quarantine.
2019

ISPs in India were found to be blocking traffic over Reddit for intermittent periods in some regions.

Jan Reddit hired former Twitter ad director Shariq Rizvi as its vice president of ad products and engineering.
Feb A $300M funding round led brought the company's valuation to $3B.

Chinese company Tencent invested $150M into Reddit.

Testes a new feature that allowed users to tip others.

Apr A social experiment subreddit called r/sequence was released.
2020
Apr r/imposter was released.
May Alexis Ohanian resigned as a member of the board.
Jun Updated its content policy, introduced rules limiting "promoting hate" and banned about 2,000 subreddits that were found to violate the new guidelines.
Aug Moderators of the subreddit r/Animemes banned the usage of the word "trap" to refer to any person or fictional character.
Dec Acquires short-form video social platform Dubsmash.
2021
Jan Announced that it had banned the subreddit r/DonaldTrump.

The GameStop short squeeze was primarily organized on the subreddit r/wallstreetbets.

Feb Reddit was valued at $6B.
Mar Appointed Drew Vollero as its first Chief Financial Officer.

Aimee Challenor was hired as an administrator for the site and removed from Reddit role following backlash

Apr Reddit released r/second.

Network Features

Reddit is a rare breed of social network.

It values community and contribution more than the individual. And it’s the place to discover new trends, memes, and viral sensations before the rest of the world hears about them.

  • Reddit thrives on anonymity, and it’s a place where pretty much anything goes.
  • There’s a thriving niche community for seemingly every interest or topic.
  • The best way to use Reddit is to find ways to contribute to subreddits and comment threads.
  • It can take time to accrue karma points, but as you do, your influence will grow.
  • There’s a strict code of ethics, and etiquette is taken very seriously.
  • The safest way to use Reddit for business is to use Reddit ads.
  • Be sure not to abuse the community for self-serving purposes.

Subreddit

Subreddit
																	Use the tabs at the top of the page to navigate subreddits. (via oberlo.com)

A subreddit is a micro-community within Reddit and is based on a certain topic – and there’s a subreddit for everything.

When you first sign up, Reddit will suggest popular subreddits to subscribe to. Then, you can head to reddit.com/subreddits to search for more subreddits.

Reddit Karma

Reddit KarmaReddit uses “karma” to establish the credibility of users. (via oberlo.com)

Due to anonymity, Reddit uses “karma” to establish the credibility of users. Every user’s profile shows the number of karma points they’ve accrued.

As your karma increases, so does your influence on the site. The more karma you have, the more seriously other users will take you.

Posting And Commenting

Posting And CommentingThere are three main types of posts that you can share on Reddit. (via berlo.com)

Reddit really is all about interaction.

Individual contributions to subreddits, posts, and discussions are the lifeblood of the site. Posting and commenting on Reddit is also how you get upvotes which increases your karma.

Share On Reddit

Share On Reddit
																	The share button (via quora.com)

Before you share something, make sure you use the Reddit search feature to check that you’re not reposting something that’s already been shared – Redditors frown upon this.

Try to make sure that whatever you share contributes something new and interesting to the subreddit.

Reddit’s Language

Share On Reddit
																	AMA: “Ask Me Anything.” (via oberlo.com)

As you browse Reddit posts and read comments, you'll notice that Redditors have developed their own lingo.

There are tons of abbreviations and special words used to communicate.

When starting out, it helps to get the basics under your belt. So, here’s a glossary of common Reddit terms to help you immerse yourself in this new world.

Reddit For Business

Share On Reddit
																	Sneak your products into a subreddit like r/shutupandtakemymoney. (via oberlo.com)

This platform is all about community. Redditors are quick to shoot down anyone who engages in self-promotion, marketing, URL shorteners, and anything else that makes it seem like you’re using Reddit as a place to sell something.

So, while you might be tempted to try to sneak your products into a subreddit, there’s always the chance it might backfire and damage your business’ brand.

The safest way to use Reddit for business is to use Reddit ads. These ads are tolerated because advertisers are being upfront about their intention to promote their business. Plus, they’re using a dedicated space for promotions instead of clogging up subreddit feeds with self-serving content.

Reddit ads allow you to target people based on the subreddits they subscribe to. This means you can promote your marketing messages directly to specific, passionate, and engaged niches.

Reddit Premium

Stats
																Reddit premium interface. (via reddit.com)

Reddit Premium replaced Reddit Gold in 2018.

Reddit Premium is a premium membership that allows users to view the site ad-free. Users may also be gifted coins if another user particularly valued the comment or post, generally due to humorous or high-quality content.

Reddit Premium unlocks several features not accessible to regular users, such as comment highlighting, exclusive subreddits, and a personalized Snoo (known as a "snoovatar").

In addition to gold coins, users can gift silver and platinum coins to other users as rewards for quality content.

Reddiquette

“Reddiquette” is the name given to Reddit’s particular rules and etiquette.

It’s extremely important to stick to etiquette to avoid being “shadowbanned.”

Because of anonymity and the widespread use of multiple accounts, Reddit created “shadowbanning”. This is the term used to describe the act of banning a user from all of Reddit if they break the rules – without the user being notified.

The shadowbanned user’s posts and comments will continue to show up for them, but other people won’t see them.

This prevents users who abuse the rules from simply setting up another account to continue their misbehavior.

So, whenever you engage on the site, always consider other people and the community first. Aim to contribute and add value. Also, remember to check and follow each subreddit’s individual guidelines.

Other Features

  • On the site, redditors commemorate their "cake day" once a year, on the anniversary of the day their account was created. Cake day adds an icon of a small slice of cake next to the user's name for 24 hours.
  • Letting users tip real money — to one guy in one subreddit.
  • Community-based Reddit chat rooms allow each subreddit can opt to add a chat room as a casual conversation alternative -- one that doesn't require refreshing to update -- and it'll be added to a directory.

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